Orbital
Distance

(a=AUs)
Orbital
Period

(P=years)
Orbital
Eccentricity

(e)
Orbital
Inclination

(i=degrees)
Mass
Estimate

(Solar)

Diameter

(Solar)

Density

(Earths)
Surface
Gravity

(Earths)

Metallicity
(Solar)
AC Mass Center0.0........................
Gliese 105 A1.4~600.75~0~0.810.85.........
Center of H.Z. A0.45...0~0...............
Gliese 105 C13.6~600.75~00.082~0.10.........
Center of H.Z. C0.0027...0~0...............


NOTE: This animation attempts to relate the orbits (and possible habitable zones) of Stars A and C in the Gliese 105 / HR 753 ABC system to their center of mass. To enlarge the display, the orbits have been arbitrarily rotated by 135 degrees. The initial display shows the known orbital tilt of the AC system (at an inclination of 11) from the visual perspective of an observer on Earth. However, the orbital inclination of any planet that may be discovered someday in this multiple star system would likely be different from those of the habitable zone orbits depicted here. At a separation of about 1,200 AUs for the AC pair, Star B is too distant to be displayed here.

Relative astrometric measurements taken over three years of the period of Star A's orbital perturbation suggest that Star C's orbit must have a high eccentricity (e= 0.75) and a semi-major axis of 15 AUs, to satisfy both the observed orbital motion and Gl 105A's astrometric period. Measurements of Gl 105A's radial velocity over 12 years show a linear trend and slope which is consistent with these orbital constraints and a nearly face-on orbit. No other stellar or brown dwarf sized objects have been detected that can cause the observed perturbation. (Golimowski et al, 2000, in ps).


 

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