Orbital
Distance

(a=AUs)
Orbital
Period

(P=years)
Orbital
Eccentricity

(e)
Orbital
Inclination

(i=degrees)

Mass

(Solar)

Diameter

(Solar)

Density

(Earths)
Surface
Gravity

(Earths)

Metallicity
(Solar)
AB Mass Center0.0........................
Mu Cassiopeiae A1.4421.750.56106.80.740.82......0.13-0.28
Disrupted H.Z. A0.680.480106.8...............
Mu Cassiopeiae B6.1721.750.56106.80.170.29......0.13-0.28
Center of H.Z. B0.080.0520106.8...............


NOTE: This animation attempts to relate the orbits (and possible habitable zones) of Stars A and B in the Mu Cassiopeiae AB system to their common center of mass. To enlarge the display, the orbits have been arbitrarily rotated by 45 degrees. Although the initial display shows the system's actual orbital tilt (at an inclination of 106.8) from the visual perspective of an observer on Earth, the orbital inclination of any planet that may be discovered someday around either star would likely be different from those of the habitable zone orbits depicted here.

In the Sixth Catalog of Orbits of Visual Binary Stars, an erroneous cited "photocentric" semi-major axis appears to have been replaced with the correct "relative" value (Drummond et al, 1995; Heintz and Cantor, 1994; and Sarah Lee Lippincott, 1981). Star A appears to be separated from its companion by a semi-major axis of 7.61 AUs (a= 1.009 +/- 0.0016 arcseconds) and moving in a highly eccentric orbit (e=0.561 +/- 0.016) that takes 21.753 +/ 0.059 years to complete. Moving as close as 3.30 AUs but as far apart as 11.9 AUs, their orbit is inclined at 106.8 +/-0.9 from the perspective of an observer on Earth.


 

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